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CEM’s Review Article on the use of Microwave Energy in Bioscience Applications Published
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CEM’s Review Article on the use of Microwave Energy in Bioscience Applications Published

CEM’s Review Article on the use of Microwave Energy in Bioscience Applications Published
News

CEM’s Review Article on the use of Microwave Energy in Bioscience Applications Published

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CEM Corporation has announced the publication of a major review article on the use of microwave energy in bioscience applications. It discusses the interaction of proteins and other biomolecules with microwaves and develops a theoretical basis for the unique effects that microwave energy has on biomolecules, such as increased reaction speed and efficiencies.

The article, entitled Microwave energy: a versatile tool for biosciences, was published in issue 8 of Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry and was written by Jonathan Collins, a Developmental Biochemist with CEM Corporation, and Nicholas Leadbeater, PhD, an Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut.

Though scientists have only started using microwaves in bioscience over the last several years, the possibilities for the technology have become readily apparent. It is currently being used for peptide synthesis, enzymatic digestion, carbohydrate chemistry, and protein hydrolysis, and it has great potential in DNA amplification.

“This article represents a significant step toward understanding the unique effect that microwave energy has on biomolecules,” said Jonathan Collins, leader of CEM’s Bioscience Division. “We hope that our novel theory on the interaction of microwaves with biomolecules will shed some light on the vast potential of the technology and help stimulate discussion and further research in its uses in bioscience.”

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