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Clinical Data and George Washington University to Examine the Impact of Genetic Testing in Warfarin Treatment
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Clinical Data and George Washington University to Examine the Impact of Genetic Testing in Warfarin Treatment

Clinical Data and George Washington University to Examine the Impact of Genetic Testing in Warfarin Treatment
News

Clinical Data and George Washington University to Examine the Impact of Genetic Testing in Warfarin Treatment

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The PGxHealth division of Clinical Data, Inc. and The George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates Department of Orthopaedic Surgery announced that they have established a relationship to examine the integration of genomic testing in warfarin treatment.

The program will be implemented in an orthopaedic practice setting during a patient's normal course of treatment, enrolling 80 patients who have been prescribed the blood thinner warfarin as a treatment measure following orthopaedic surgery.

Of those 80 patients, a randomly-assigned half will have their warfarin dose determined with the help of PGxPredict™:WARFARIN in order to evaluate the potential clinical, safety and treatment-time benefits of using the genetic test to determine optimal warfarin dosing.

The program has already received approval from the University Institutional Review Board and is open to enrollment. If the program results are positive, pharmacogenetic testing could be incorporated into the Clinic's routine practice.

"Warfarin is a drug with both valuable benefits and serious risks, so it is an ideal candidate for assessing whether pharmacogenetic testing can improve patient outcomes and reduce treatment costs," said Dr. Carol Reed, Clinical Data's Chief Medical Officer.

"Clinical Data and the GW Medical Faculty Associates hope to assess the value of tests such as PGxPredict™ WARFARIN in a typical practice setting. Combined with its proprietary genetic tests for clozapine safety and rituximab efficacy, Clinical Data seeks to transform advances in molecular biology into clinical products to benefit patients, physicians and payers," Dr. Reed continued.

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