We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Comparison of Real-Time Quantitative PCR and Culture for the Diagnosis of Emerging Rickettsioses
News

Comparison of Real-Time Quantitative PCR and Culture for the Diagnosis of Emerging Rickettsioses

Comparison of Real-Time Quantitative PCR and Culture for the Diagnosis of Emerging Rickettsioses
News

Comparison of Real-Time Quantitative PCR and Culture for the Diagnosis of Emerging Rickettsioses

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Comparison of Real-Time Quantitative PCR and Culture for the Diagnosis of Emerging Rickettsioses"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Summary

Diagnosis of Rickettsia infection would benefit by use of the more rapid and sensitive method of quantitative realtime PCR than the time-intensive and less sensitive method of culturing Rickettsia species from skin biopsies. We evaluated culture sensitivity compared to PCR according to sampling delay and previous antibiotic treatment. We found that skin biopsies can be positive even when molecular tests were negative, and a negative result using molecular assays did not exclude the diagnosis of Rickettsia spp. infection. Rickettsia africae was the most common species in skin biopsies and R. slovaca was most common in ticks. We found a positive correlation between the number of bacteria copies and the isolation success in skin biopsies and ticks. The probability of isolating Rickettsia spp. was higher in untreated patients and in patients from our hometown. To increase the sensitivity of culture, skin biopsies should be sampled before treatment early in the course of the disease and should be inoculated as soon as possible.

This article is published online in PLoS ONE and is free to access.

Advertisement