DNA Replication Depends on High Speed Electron Transport

News   Feb 28, 2017 | Original story from California Institute of Technology

 
DNA Replication Depends on High Speed Electron Transport

A protein called DNA primase (tan) begins to replicate DNA when an iron-sulfur cluster within it is oxidized, or loses an electron (blue and purple). Once this primase has made an RNA primer, a protein signaling partner, presumably DNA polymerase alpha (blue), sends an electron from its reduced cluster, which has an extra electron (yellow and red). The electron travels through the DNA/RNA helix to primase, which comes off the DNA. This electron transfer signals the next steps in replication. Credit: Caltech

 
 
 

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