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Enhanced Molecular Inversion Probes for NGS Target Enrichment
News

Enhanced Molecular Inversion Probes for NGS Target Enrichment

Enhanced Molecular Inversion Probes for NGS Target Enrichment
News

Enhanced Molecular Inversion Probes for NGS Target Enrichment

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Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT) will present its findings on the use of molecular inversion probes (MIPs) for next generation sequencing (NGS) target enrichment at the 15th annual Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting in Marco Island, Florida, Feb 12-15.

John Havens PhD, Vice-President of Business Development at IDT, will talk about MIPs and their proven effectiveness in the enrichment of genomic content of biological samples for specific regions of interest. NGS can subsequently be used to characterize these regions at high coverage depths.

In comparison to other methods, MIPs provide high multiplexability of targets in a single tube, which combined with the ability to enrich small amounts of DNA, results in time- and cost-effective sequencing.

IDT has developed a procedure whereby a high-fidelity platform is used to synthesize MIPs as long as 200 bases, chemically phosphorylating them independent of sequence. The presence of full length MIPs is then verified using mass spectroscopy prior to pooling.

Barcodes can be directly incorporated via degenerate bases and used to characterize the complexity of target capture. Dr Havens will demonstrate the advantage of these MIPs in terms of target specificity and the capture of longer targets.

A direct comparison will also be given of this approach with hybridization for a set of oncology targets, highlighting the benefits of MIPs over more traditional methods.

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