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Foundation Medicine’s Next-Generation Sequencing Data to be Presented at 103rd AACR Annual Meeting 2012
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Foundation Medicine’s Next-Generation Sequencing Data to be Presented at 103rd AACR Annual Meeting 2012

Foundation Medicine’s Next-Generation Sequencing Data to be Presented at 103rd AACR Annual Meeting 2012
News

Foundation Medicine’s Next-Generation Sequencing Data to be Presented at 103rd AACR Annual Meeting 2012

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Foundation Medicine, Inc. announced that new data highlighting the company’s next-generation sequencing approach in clinical oncology will be presented at the 103rd American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2012 being held March 31 through April 4 in Chicago.

The presentations will highlight the technical feasibility and clinical relevance of the company’s next-generation sequencing platform for oncology, which offers a fully informative genomic profile of the relevant alterations present in about 200 genes known to be somatically altered in human cancers. In these studies, the profile demonstrated concordance with existing commercial offerings and identified all classes of genomic alterations. In one study being presented, approximately 70 percent of cases were found to carry one or more actionable alterations, meaning the alteration could plausibly confer sensitivity or resistance to approved or experimental targeted therapies. The studies also identified more classes of alterations, including base pair mutations, insertions and deletions, copy number alterations and select gene fusions and rearrangements, than other commercially available molecular diagnostic tests.

“The data presented at AACR show that the breadth and relevance of Foundation Medicine’s genomic profile may offer important information for cancer treatment decisions, while fitting easily into routine clinical practice,” said Vincent Miller, M.D., senior vice president, clinical development, Foundation Medicine. “These findings support the feasibility of our fundamental mission to help practicing oncologists integrate the unique molecular information for each patient’s tumor into clinical decision making.”

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