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Has Your Doctor Had Enough Sleep? DNA Damage Caused by Sleep Deprivation
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Has Your Doctor Had Enough Sleep? DNA Damage Caused by Sleep Deprivation

Has Your Doctor Had Enough Sleep? DNA Damage Caused by Sleep Deprivation
News

Has Your Doctor Had Enough Sleep? DNA Damage Caused by Sleep Deprivation

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Sleep deprivation was associated with DNA damage in a new Anaesthesia study.

In the observational study on 49 healthy full-time doctors who had their blood analyzed at different time points, on-call doctors who were required to work overnight on-site had lower DNA repair gene expression and more DNA breaks than participants who did not work overnight. In these overnight on-site call doctors, DNA repair gene expression decreased and DNA breaks increased after sleep deprivation. Damaged DNA increased after only one night of sleep deprivation.

Although additional research is needed, this DNA damage may help explain the increased risk for cancer and cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurodegenerative diseases associated with sleep deprivation.

“Although this work is very preliminary, it is clear from the results that even a single night of sleep deprivation can trigger events that may contribute to the development of chronic disease,” said senior author Dr. Siu-Wai Choi, of the University of Hong Kong.

"Anaesthetists (and other health professionals) frequently work night shifts and on call duties, and their work patterns change frequently between night and day work. This study is important in that it will allow future researchers to study the impact of changing the way we work and other interventions by evaluating DNA breaks in the same way as the authors of this groundbreaking study have done,” said Dr Klein, the Editor-in-Chief of the journal.

This article has been republished from materials provided by Wiley. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference: V. Cheung, V. M. Yuen, G. T. C. Wong and S. W. Choi. 2019. The effect of sleep deprivation and disruption on DNA damage and health of doctors. Anaesthesia. https://doi.org/10.1111/anae.14533.

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