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How To Tame "Jumping Genes" in a Genome

News   Apr 09, 2021 | Original story from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

 
How To Tame "Jumping Genes" in a Genome

This is a structure of the Asterix/Gtsf1 protein. Asterix/Gtsf1 helps immobilize so-called "jumping genes" in germ cells, a type of cell important for sexual reproduction. CSHL Professor & HHMI Investigator Leemor Joshua-Tor and a research investigator in her lab, Jonathan Ipsaro, used two different biophysical techniques, cryo-EM and NMR, to develop their model. In this NMR structure, the purple helix binds to a tRNA, a special class of RNA, which is speculated to escort it to a jumping gene. The blue surface of the protein is positively charged, which helps it bind to negatively charged RNA molecules. The red area on the right is negatively charged. Credit: Ipsaro/Joshua-Tor lab, CSHL/2021.

 
 
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