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HTS Basics: Theory and Practice of High-Throughput Screening Against Chemical Libraries
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HTS Basics: Theory and Practice of High-Throughput Screening Against Chemical Libraries

HTS Basics: Theory and Practice of High-Throughput Screening Against Chemical Libraries
News

HTS Basics: Theory and Practice of High-Throughput Screening Against Chemical Libraries

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Every Wednesday in October SBS presents a five-module web seminar. As an ongoing education feature of the Society for Biomolecular Sciences, the Society brings the top industry experts into a personnel environment. Both individuals and institutions can acquire the in-depth knowledge they need, without incurring travel expenses or undue time out of the office or lab.

SBS has launched a new web-based program designed to provide understanding of specific topics of interest in drug discovery. The weekly, live, interactive series is entitled  “HTS Basics: Theory and Practice of High-Throughput Screening Against Chemical Libraries."

Module 1: Overview of Strategies and Methods in HTS
David Dunn, Pharmacopeia (funded by Promega, Inc.)
Who would benefit: Scientists new to or learning the field of lead discovery and HTS would benefit from an overview of the HTS process in the context of relevant drug screening examples.

Module 2: Liquid Handling and Detention Technologies in HTS
Daniel Sipes, Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (funded by Promega, Inc.)
Who would benefit: Scientists planning on developing assays for HTS.  Scientists interested in liquid handlers and detectors for HTS.

Module 3: Statistical Considerations in the Optimization and Validation of HTS Assays
Devanarayan Viswanath, Abbott Laboratories (funded by Beckman Coulter)
Who would benefit: Scientists interested in learning about the multi-factorial optimization approach, meaningful validation parameters and multivariate correlations.

Module 4: Issues in Storage and Management of Compound Collections
Chris Lipinski, Melior Discovery (funded by Corning)
Who would benefit: Scientists in HTS labs where compound libraries are maintained and arrayed., as well as scientists using HTS data in their research.

Module 5: HTS Case Studies and Lessons Learned
Doug Auld, NIH; Glenn Hofmann, GlaxoSmithKline; Thompson Doman and Jeff Weidner, Eli Lilly and Company (funded by Aurora Biotechnologies)
Who would benefit: Scientists developing both biochemical and cell-based assays for HTS.

Who Should Attend:
This online course should be useful to those new to the field of laboratory assay development for target evaluation, High Throughput Screening (HTS) assays, directed screening applications, and compound profiling and assays for secondary screening.  It is also targeted to those desiring additional information on multiwell assay technology and development, quality control, data analysis and assay automation. In addition, those that have been in the laboratory but who want an update on the assay tools for their favorite targets will benefit.

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