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Invitrogen Scientists Link microRNA Sequences to Cancer Using RNA Samples from BioServe
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Invitrogen Scientists Link microRNA Sequences to Cancer Using RNA Samples from BioServe

Invitrogen Scientists Link microRNA Sequences to Cancer Using RNA Samples from BioServe
News

Invitrogen Scientists Link microRNA Sequences to Cancer Using RNA Samples from BioServe

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In research demonstrating that RNA previously thought to have no biological relevance may be of use for therapeutic and diagnostic targets, Invitrogen Corporation and BioServe announced that their technologies identified noncoding RNAs that were differentially expressed in healthy and diseased tissue. These micro ribonucleic acid (miRNA) sequences were either up or down-regulated between matched samples of RNA isolated from healthy colon and colorectal cancer tissues.

Data was presented in a poster at the annual meeting for the American Association for Cancer Research.

Invitrogen researchers used RNA samples from BioServe’s OncoRNA product line, a series of RNAs isolated from fresh-frozen, fully annotated tumor and adjacent normal tissues, to probe the NCode™ Human miRNA microarray V3. NCode™ Profiler software identified miRNAs that were either up- or down-regulated in tumor versus healthy tissue, and researchers used quantitative PCR to validate the findings.

“Using the high quality RNA samples from BioServe, we were able to identify novel microRNA sequences that could potentially be involved in the generation of new tumor tissues, particularly in colorectal cancer,” said Chris Adams, research and development leader of Epigenetics at Invitrogen. “If more stringently validated, these disease-related microRNAs may eventually serve as targets for diagnostic or therapeutic development.”

MicroRNAs are short RNA sequences that do not code for specific proteins but are extremely important in the regulation of gene expression; they are implicated in several disease states including cancer and heart disease. Among the activity of miRNAs is the triggering of messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation and the inhibition of protein translation – the process of assembling amino acids into proteins based on the instructions contained in mRNA sequences.

Invitrogen’s NCode™ Human miRNA microarray V3 consists of miRNA content from multiple sources, including the Sanger 10.0 miRNA database and novel miRNAs unavailable in public databases, giving users access to strong content for identification and study of miRNAs.

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