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Korean Scientists Develop New Cloning Strategy Based on Non-template PCR
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Korean Scientists Develop New Cloning Strategy Based on Non-template PCR

Korean Scientists Develop New Cloning Strategy Based on Non-template PCR
News

Korean Scientists Develop New Cloning Strategy Based on Non-template PCR

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The paper, which is set to be published in Biotechnology Letters, details how scientists from the Seoul National University have utilized non-template PCR to clone multiple repeats, a task that traditionally has been time consuming and difficult. 

The abstract for the paper is listed below and can be read online at http://www.springerlink.com/content/100138/

Abstract

A new cloning method for generating multiple repeats of amino acids is described which can be used as biomaterials, protein polymers and biomedical applications. Although several traditional methods for cloning multiple repeats are still exploited, these are laborious and complicated because they must go through several consecutive cloning steps. To solve these problems, synthetic gene libraries encoding repetitive patterns were constructed by using non-template PCR. As a result, a 'length library' with fourteen different ELP repeating genes was constructed and expressed in a cell-free protein synthesis system. These results showed our novel cloning method is efficient, and has the potential capacity for synthesizing repetitive genes by PCR to be cloned in any commercial expression vectors.

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