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Kyushu University and Perlegen Identify Haplotypes in the Japanese Population
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Kyushu University and Perlegen Identify Haplotypes in the Japanese Population

Kyushu University and Perlegen Identify Haplotypes in the Japanese Population
News

Kyushu University and Perlegen Identify Haplotypes in the Japanese Population

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Researchers at Kyushu University of Japan, in collaboration with Perlegen Sciences, Inc., have identified common patterns of human DNA sequence variation, or haplotypes, in the Japanese population.

By combining a unique set of DNA samples collected at the Medical Institute of Bioregulation at Kyushu University with Perlegen's high throughput, whole-genome analysis approach, based on next generation Affymetrix GeneChip® technology, the collaborators identified common haplotypes that can be used to conduct comprehensive genetic research on human disease and variable response to medicines.
 
“Understanding the patterns of genetic variation in the Japanese population will greatly enhance our ability to identify genes associated with disease and drug response,” stated Dr. Kenshi Hayashi, Professor of the Research Center for Genetic Information, Medical Institute of Bioregulation at Kyushu University.

“The unique approach of this study complements the recently completed International HapMap project. Both studies make critical contributions to enabling personalized medicine in Japan.”

“With this study, Dr. Hayashi and his colleagues at Kyushu University have made an important contribution to medical research in Japan,” stated David Cox, Chief Scientific Officer of Perlegen.

“It will enable researchers to identify the genetic factors that determine why drugs work well for some patients, but not for others.”

“Collaborating with the top researchers in Japan such as Dr. Hayashi is a priority for Perlegen,” stated Akira Usui, General Manager of Perlegen Japan, KK. “We are committed to improving the therapeutic treatments available to Japanese patients.”

Kyushu University and Perlegen Sciences will report their findings in the October 26 issue of Genome Research.

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