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Leiden University Medical Center Adopts Fluidigm BioMark™ Real-time PCR System
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Leiden University Medical Center Adopts Fluidigm BioMark™ Real-time PCR System

Leiden University Medical Center Adopts Fluidigm BioMark™ Real-time PCR System
News

Leiden University Medical Center Adopts Fluidigm BioMark™ Real-time PCR System

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Fluidigm Corporation and BIOKE, distributor of Fluidigm systems in the Benelux, have announced that Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) has purchased the BioMark Real-time PCR System.

The system was installed in the laboratory of Professor Gert-Jan B. Van Ommen, head of the Department of Human Genetics and founder of the Leiden Genome Technology Center (LGTC), a principal genomics facility in The Netherlands.

“The LUMC has been at the forefront of technology for genetic research, and the BioMark system helps to uphold that tradition,” said Dr. Van Ommen.

According to Fluidigm, the BioMark system is based on dynamic arrays. BioMark dynamic arrays require one fortieth the setup steps, compared to 384-well microplates, because assays are automatically assembled on-chip by means of nanofluidic networks.

In addition, dynamic arrays can provide a means for multiplexing any 48 genes (off-the-shelf primer-probe sets) against any 48 samples, generating 2,304 assays per run. Optional analysis software enables dynamic arrays to be used for genotyping.

Professor Van Ommen’s laboratory also plans to use BioMark digital arrays, which are crafted to partition a single sample/reagent mixture into 765 assays. This way, target sequences are detectable even if present in low copy number or are very similar to background sequences. The digital array is useful for cancer research and disease monitoring.

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