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Long-read Genome Sequencing Used for First Time in a Patient

News   Jun 26, 2017 | Original story from Stanford University

 
Long-read Genome Sequencing Used for First Time in a Patient

Euan Ashley and his collaborators used long-read genome sequencing to diagnose a rare condition in a Stanford patient. It's the first time the technique has been used in a clinical setting. Steve Fisch

 
 
 

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