We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Mutation May Have Helped Mammoths Tolerate the Cold
News

Mutation May Have Helped Mammoths Tolerate the Cold

Mutation May Have Helped Mammoths Tolerate the Cold
News

Mutation May Have Helped Mammoths Tolerate the Cold

By Flying Puffin (MammutUploaded by FunkMonk) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Mutation May Have Helped Mammoths Tolerate the Cold "

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Columbia University biomedical researchers have captured close-up views of TRPV3, a skin-cell ion channel that plays important roles in sensing temperature, itch, and pain.


In humans, defects in the protein can lead to skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema), vitiligo (uneven skin coloration), skin cancer, and rosacea.


All vertebrate DNA, including the woolly mammoth genome, contains the TRPV3 gene. Though the mammoths lived in extremely cold environments, they descended from elephants that lived in the tropics. Researchers think that changes in the TRPV3 genes of mammoths may have helped them withstand lower temperatures.


Alexander Sobolevsky's lab at Columbia University Irving Medical Center used a powerful imaging technique called cryo-electron microscopy to take pictures of TRPV3 molecules. Initial 2D images were collected by freezing the molecules in an extremely thin, clear layer of ice and bombarding them with electrons. The researchers then used computational tools to convert the 2D images into detailed molecular 3D models.


This is the first time scientists have gotten a glimpse of TRPV3 in atomic detail. The researchers were able to get images of the protein in two states, revealing how the channel opens and closes to let ions flow into skin cells.


This exchange of ions prompts the body to react to sensations such as pain, itchiness, and changes in temperature. The group also discovered how a small molecule with anti-cancer properties called 2-APB interacts with and controls the function of this channel.


The structures in this study provide clues about how mutations in TRPV3 affect the channel's ability to sense temperature and show that lipids -- molecules that make up most of the cell membrane -- contact the channel in several regions. Mammoth TRPV3 contains a mutation in one of these lipid-touching regions.


"Temperature affects the interaction of lipids and proteins," Sobolevsky says. "A mutation in the woolly mammoth channel would most likely affect this interaction and could explain how these animals adapted to their cold environment."


Researchers will use the structure to investigate how atomic changes to the protein cause it to malfunction in human diseases. "This study gives scientists a template they can use to design more effective drugs for treating these skin-related illnesses," said Appu Singh, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Sobolevsky lab and a first author of the paper.

This article has been republished from materials provided by Columbia University Irving Medical Center. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference:
Singh, A. K., McGoldrick, L. L., & Sobolevsky, A. I. (2018). Structure and gating mechanism of the transient receptor potential channel TRPV3. Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, 1. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41594-018-0108-7

Advertisement