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Neurologix Commences its Phase II Clinical Trial of Gene Transfer Approach for Treatment of Parkinson's Disease
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Neurologix Commences its Phase II Clinical Trial of Gene Transfer Approach for Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

Neurologix Commences its Phase II Clinical Trial of Gene Transfer Approach for Treatment of Parkinson's Disease
News

Neurologix Commences its Phase II Clinical Trial of Gene Transfer Approach for Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

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Neurologix, Inc. has announced that it has initiated its Phase II clinical trial for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. The first trial participants have undergone surgery at multiple institutions and additional subjects are currently being enrolled.

The purpose of the trial is to validate the safety and efficacy of Neurologix's gene transfer therapy, a novel non-dopaminergic approach to restore motor function in Parkinson's patients who are sub-optimally responsive to available drug therapy. Neurologix's approach is to reestablish the production of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), the major brain inhibitory neurotransmitter that helps "quiet" excessive neuronal firing and has been determined to be deficient in patients in the advanced stages of Parkinson's disease.

John E. Mordock, President and Chief Executive Officer of Neurologix, stated, "Initiating this Phase II clinical trial represents a significant milestone. We expect to enroll 40 subjects across six to eight leading U.S. academic research centers, with completion of enrollment expected during the second half of 2009."

In Parkinson's disease there is degeneration of many cells in the central nervous system including those that produce dopamine, which leads to a downstream deficiency in GABA signaling in areas of the brain that regulate movement. Most current therapies and research approaches target dopamine.

Mr. Mordock commented, "In contrast, our preclinical and clinical research suggests that directly targeting GABA production rather than dopamine replacement may be a more effective way of improving brain function in late-stage Parkinson's disease while also avoiding the known therapeutic limitations and complications associated with the over-production of dopamine."

The Co-Chairmen of the trial Steering Committee are Dr. Andrew Feigin, Director of the Neuroscience Experimental Therapeutics Research Program at the Feinstein Institute of Medical Research of the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, and Dr. Peter LeWitt, a neurologist who directs the Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Program at Henry Ford Hospital in Southfield, Michigan.

"Based on the encouraging functional and imaging results seen in the Phase I study of this innovative approach to improving Parkinson's disease, we are extremely excited to be part of this study," said Dr. Feigin.

Dr. LeWitt added, "The start of this clinical trial provides hope to the patient population which has had a longstanding need for new treatment options."
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