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Pfizer and Perlegen Form Genetics Research Collaboration

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News

Pfizer and Perlegen Form Genetics Research Collaboration

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Perlegen Sciences, Inc. has announced four-year research collaboration with Pfizer Inc for whole genome and replication studies that may identify genes associated with major diseases and predict patient responses to certain medicines.

Researchers from both companies will conduct whole genome studies involving DNA samples from clinical trials. Pfizer and Perlegen scientists will design the research and analyze the results.

Perlegen will conduct the genotyping, "reading" of the DNA, in the individual samples, using Affymetrix GeneChip® technology.

Under the terms of the agreement, Perlegen and Pfizer will share in certain intellectual property rights resulting from the collaboration. Pfizer will provide research payments to Perlegen.

Pfizer and Perlegen scientists entered their first collaboration in December of 2002, conducting genetic research on thousands of DNA samples in areas such as metabolic syndrome and drug response in patients with Major Depression Disorder.

In November 2004, they published their initial research findings on the genetics of HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol in Human Genomics.

"We are excited to continue our collaboration with the outstanding scientific team at Pfizer Inc," said Paul J. Cusenza, Senior Vice President of Perlegen Sciences.

"We hope the results of our genetic research together will lead to improved health care for patients."

"It is a pleasure to be doing such significant collaborative genetic research with the scientific team at Pfizer," said David R. Cox, M.D., Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of Perlegen Sciences.

"By combining the scientific strengths of Perlegen and Pfizer, we greatly improve the prospect of positively impacting a number of presently unmet medical needs."

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