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Phase I and II SBIR Grants Issued to Biosearch
News

Phase I and II SBIR Grants Issued to Biosearch

Phase I and II SBIR Grants Issued to Biosearch
News

Phase I and II SBIR Grants Issued to Biosearch

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Biosearch Technologies, Inc. (BTI) has announced that two staff scientists have been awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Grants by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.

The first, a $750,000 SBIR Phase II grant funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), will fund the development of fluorescence-based reporter assays incorporating a recently discovered azoreductase that has been shown to release high-quality fluorescent signals. This work has important implications for significantly increasing the data generated by existing high-throughput drug screening technologies through the multiplexing of two or more reporter assays in one screening run.

The second, a $100,000 SBIR Phase I grant again funded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), will fund the development of technology for engineering bacterial chromosomes utilizing synthetic DNA. Outgrowths of this technology will enable the facile engineering of bacterial strains for a variety of applications including bioremediation, natural products and biofuel production.

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