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Rapid Plant Disease Detection With Novel Microneedle Technique

News   Jun 11, 2019 | Original story from North Carolina State University

 
Rapid Plant Disease Detection With Novel Microneedle Technique

Researchers have developed a new technique that uses microneedle patches to collect DNA from plant tissues in one minute, rather than the hours needed for conventional techniques. DNA extraction is the first step in identifying plant diseases, and the new method holds promise for the development of on-site plant disease detection tools. Credit: NC State University.

 
 
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