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Reaction Biology Announces New Epigenetic Production Facilities
News

Reaction Biology Announces New Epigenetic Production Facilities

Reaction Biology Announces New Epigenetic Production Facilities
News

Reaction Biology Announces New Epigenetic Production Facilities

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"The new facility expands our space by over 50%, and gives us the ability to greatly expand our production of epigenetic related proteins," remarked Dr. Haiching Ma, RBC Chief Technology Officer. "We will be able to accelerate growth of our list of available targets, and add space for new collaborations."

RBC simultaneously announced that it has expanded its available list of methyltransferase and related proteins to 27, and is continuing to add more. A number of the proteins are exclusive to RBC and cannot be found elsewhere. RBC now offers 25 HMT/DNMT's, including all of the human members of the important MLL/SET1 family of multi-protein complexes, along with 11 HDAC's, 4 SIRT's, 7 HAT's, and 12 DUB's.

The field of epigenetics is rapidly becoming the new focus of the drug-discovery and pharmaceutical industry. Epigenetic targets modulate gene expression, and have been indicated in a wide variety of diseases and conditions including cancer, inflammation, metabolic and neuropsychiatric diseases.

"The ability to selectively control gene expression is a holy grail for drug researchers. Drugs that successfully inhibit HMT or DNMT targets could be hugely effective," said Dr. Konrad Howitz, RBC Director of Epigenetics. "With the largest panel of such targets and proprietary high-quality proteins, we believe RBC could play a central role in this new research."

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