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Recycling Old Genes to Gain New Functions

News   Jun 26, 2017 | Original story from Rochester University

 
Recycling Old Genes to Gain New Functions

Tiny parasitic Jewel Wasps and their rapidly changing venom are the subjects of a new study by researchers in the University of Rochester's Werren Lab. (University photo / J. Adam Fenster)

 
 
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