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Roots, Shoots and Leaves: How Plants Keep Symbionts in Check

News   Sep 26, 2018 | Original Press Release from Aarhus University

 
Roots, Shoots and Leaves: How Plants Keep Symbionts in Check

Upper panel: Wild type roots form nodules whether or not they are transgenic (the latter are marked by green fluorescence). Lower panel: Downregulation of miR2111 in transgenic roots (marked by green fluorescence) leads to reduced symbiosis. Nitrogen-fixing nodules (red fluorescence) preferentially form on non-transgenic roots that have normal miR2111 activity. Credit: Katharina Markmann.

 
 
 

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