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Senior Genetix Scientist to Present at 10th Anniversary Conference
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Senior Genetix Scientist to Present at 10th Anniversary Conference

Senior Genetix Scientist to Present at 10th Anniversary Conference
News

Senior Genetix Scientist to Present at 10th Anniversary Conference

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Dr Chris Mann, Senior Scientist, Mammalian Cell Biology at Genetix (New Milton, UK) has been invited to speak at the 10th Cell Culture Engineering Conference to be held in Whistler, Canada, 23 – 28 April 2006.

The conference, held every two years, is a venue for the academic, industrial and regulatory communities to debate new developments in animal cell culture research.

The 10th anniversary meeting will include topics ranging from fundamental science to the engineering challenges of cell culture process development.

Dr Mann’s presentation, entitled: A Novel One-Step Technology for Accelerating Discovery of Highly Productive Mammalian Cell Lines forms part of the first session of the meeting on Accelerating Cell Line Development and Clinical Candidate Optimization.

Focussing on practical applications of the technology that is rapidly becoming an accepted leader in the field, Dr Mann will outline how researchers can screen large numbers of cell clones for specific protein/monoclonal antibody expression, and quantitatively collect only the best secretors.

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