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Some Morbidly Obese People are Missing Genes, Shows New Research
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Some Morbidly Obese People are Missing Genes, Shows New Research

Some Morbidly Obese People are Missing Genes, Shows New Research
News

Some Morbidly Obese People are Missing Genes, Shows New Research

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A small but significant proportion of morbidly obese people are missing a section of their DNA, according to research published in Nature. The authors of the study, from Imperial College London and ten other European Centres, say that missing DNA such as that identified in this research may be having a dramatic effect on some people's weight.

According to the new findings, around seven in every thousand morbidly obese people are missing a part of their DNA, containing approximately 30 genes. The researchers did not find this kind of genetic variation in any normal weight people.

There are an estimated 700,000 morbidly obese people in England, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of over 40. Researchers believe that the weight problems of around one in twenty morbidly obese people are due to known genetic variations, including mutations and missing DNA. Many more similar obesity-causing mutations, such as the one in this study, remain to be found, says the team.

Previous research had identified several genetic variations that contribute to obesity, most of which are single mutations in a person's DNA that change the function of a gene. The research is the first to clearly demonstrate that obesity in otherwise physically healthy individuals can be caused by a rare genetic variation in which a section of a person's DNA is missing. The researchers do not yet know the function of the missing genes, but previous research has suggested that some of them may be associated with delayed development, autism and schizophrenia.

People inherit two copies of their DNA, one from their mother and one from their father. Sometimes, missing one copy of one or several genes - as in the individuals identified in this latest study - can have a drastic effect on the body.

The researchers believe there may be other genetic deletions, in addition to those identified today, that increase a person's risk of becoming obese. They hope that by identifying genetic variations causing people to be extremely obese, they can develop genetic tests to help determine the best course of treatment for these individuals.

Professor Philippe Froguel, lead author of the study from the School of Public Health at Imperial College London, said: "Although the recent rise in obesity in the developed world is down to an unhealthy environment, with an abundance of unhealthy food and many people taking very little exercise, the difference in the way people respond to this environment is often genetic. It is becoming increasingly clear that for some morbidly obese people, their weight gain has an underlying genetic cause. If we can identify these individuals through genetic testing, we can then offer them appropriate support and medical interventions, such as the option of weight loss surgery, to improve their long-term health."
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