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Study of Helicobacter pylori Genotype Status in Saliva, Dental Plaques, Stool and Gastric Biopsy Samples
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Study of Helicobacter pylori Genotype Status in Saliva, Dental Plaques, Stool and Gastric Biopsy Samples

Study of Helicobacter pylori Genotype Status in Saliva, Dental Plaques, Stool and Gastric Biopsy Samples
News

Study of Helicobacter pylori Genotype Status in Saliva, Dental Plaques, Stool and Gastric Biopsy Samples

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Abstract

AIM:
To compare genotype of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolated from saliva, dental plaques, gastric biopsy, and stool of each patient in order to evaluate the mode of transmission of H. pylori infection.

METHODS:
This cross-sectional descriptive study was performed on 300 antral gastric biopsy, saliva, dental plaque and stool samples which were obtained from patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy referred to endoscopy centre of Hajar hospital of Shahrekord, Iran from March 2010 to February 2011. Initially, H. pylori strains were identified by rapid urease test (RUT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied to determine the presence of H. pylori (ureC) and for genotyping of voculating cytotoxin gene A (vacA) and cytotoxin associated gene A (cagA) genes in each specimen. Finally the data were analyzed by using statistical formulas such as Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to find any significant relationship between these genes and patient's diseases. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

RESULTS:
Of 300 gastric biopsy samples, 77.66% were confirmed to be H. pylori positive by PCR assay while this bacterium were detected in 10.72% of saliva, 71.67% of stool samples. We were not able to find it in dental plaque specimens. The prevalence of H. pylori was 90.47% among patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD), 80% among patients with gastric cancer, and 74.13% among patients with none ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) by PCR assay. The evaluation of vacA and cagA genes showed 6 differences between gastric biopsy and saliva specimens and 11 differences between gastric and stool specimens. 94.42% of H. pylori positive specimens were cagA positive and all samples had amplified band both for vacA s and m regions. There was significant relationship between vacA s1a/m1a and PUD diseases (P = 0.04), s2/m2 genotype and NUD diseases (P = 0.05). No statically significant relationship was found between cagA status with clinical outcomes and vacA genotypes (P = 0.65). The evaluation of vacA and cagA genes showed 6 differences between gastric biopsy and saliva specimens and 11 differences between gastric and stool specimens.

CONCLUSION:
Regard to high similarity in genotype of H. pylori isolates from saliva, stomach and stool, this study support the idea which fecal- oral is the main route of H. pylori transmission and oral cavity may serve as a reservoir for H. pylori, however, remarkable genotype diversity among stomach, saliva and stool samples showed that more than one H. pylori genotype may exist in a same patient.

This article is published online in the World Journal of Gastroenterology and is free to access.

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