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Using Thin Nanopore Sensors for the Rapid Detection of Probe-specific MicroRNAs
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Using Thin Nanopore Sensors for the Rapid Detection of Probe-specific MicroRNAs

Using Thin Nanopore Sensors for the Rapid Detection of Probe-specific MicroRNAs
News

Using Thin Nanopore Sensors for the Rapid Detection of Probe-specific MicroRNAs

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Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and New England Biolabs have developed a platform for the rapid electronic detection of probe-hybridized microRNAs from cellular RNA. Overcoming a difficult challenge within RNAi research.

Abstract

Small RNA molecules have an important role in gene regulation and RNA silencing therapy, but it is challenging to detect these molecules without the use of time-consuming radioactive labelling assays or error-prone amplification methods.
Here, we present a platform for the rapid electronic detection of probe-hybridized microRNAs from cellular RNA. In this platform, a target microRNA is first hybridized to a probe. This probe:microRNA duplex is then enriched through binding to the viral protein p19. Finally, the abundance of the duplex is quantified using a nanopore. Reducing the thickness of the membrane containing the nanopore to 6 nm leads to increased signal amplitudes from biomolecules, and reducing the diameter of the nanopore to 3 nm allows the detection and discrimination of small nucleic acids based on differences in their physical dimensions. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by detecting picogram levels of a liver-specific miRNA from rat liver RNA.

The article is published online within Nature Nanotechnology and is free to access.

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