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Workflows for Microarray Data Processing in the Kepler Environment
News

Workflows for Microarray Data Processing in the Kepler Environment

Workflows for Microarray Data Processing in the Kepler Environment
News

Workflows for Microarray Data Processing in the Kepler Environment

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Background

Microarray data analysis has been the subject of extensive and ongoing pipeline development due to its complexity, the availability of several options at each analysis step, and the development of new analysis demands, including integration with new data sources. Bioinformatics pipelines are usually custom built for different applications, making them typically difficult to modify, extend and repurpose. Scientific workflow systems are intended to address these issues by providing general-purpose frameworks in which to develop and execute such pipelines. The Kepler workflow environment is a well-established system under continual development that is employed in several areas of scientific research. Kepler provides a flexible graphical interface, featuring clear display of parameter values, for design and modification of workflows. It has capabilities for developing novel computational components in the R, Python, and Java programming languages, all of which are widely used for bioinformatics algorithm development, along with capabilities for invoking external applications and using web services.

This article is published online in BMC Bioinformatics and is free to access.

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