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IDT’s Newsletter Provides An Insight Into the Therapeutic Use of RNAi
Product News

IDT’s Newsletter Provides An Insight Into the Therapeutic Use of RNAi

IDT’s Newsletter Provides An Insight Into the Therapeutic Use of RNAi
Product News

IDT’s Newsletter Provides An Insight Into the Therapeutic Use of RNAi


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Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT), has released the second issue of its educational and informative newsletter, Decoded.

Available to download for free, the second issue of this quarterly newsletter includes a wealth of scientific content, and features an interview with Dr John Rossi (Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope (Duarte, CA)).

With a focus on the biology and applications of eukaryotic small RNAs and their therapeutic use in HIV/AIDS and cancer, Dr Rossi’s research provides an insight into the field of RNA interference (RNAi) and its potential uses.

In his work Dr Rossi used IDT’s DsiRNA to target genes for silencing: “HIV puts its envelope out to the surface of a cell as part of the packaging process when it infects a cell. The envelope is present on the cell membrane before the virus assembles, so we thought that it could act as a receptor and the Dicer-substrate siRNA (DsiRNA) might get internalized via pinocytosis. We developed our own aptamer which was internalized nicely and, when we tagged it with a DsiRNA, we got good delivery, processing of the siRNA in cells, and target knockdown.”

To benefit from all of this and more on a regular basis, sign up to receive each quarterly issue of Decoded in print or electronically at www.idtdna.com/decoded.

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