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SNPbrowser™ Software version 3.0 aimed at Disease Association Research Studies
Product News

SNPbrowser™ Software version 3.0 aimed at Disease Association Research Studies

SNPbrowser™ Software version 3.0 aimed at Disease Association Research Studies
Product News

SNPbrowser™ Software version 3.0 aimed at Disease Association Research Studies


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Applied Biosystems has announced release of a version of its SNPbrowser™ Software tool, designed to streamline the selection of single nucleotide polymorphism assays for disease association studies.

The software is designed to provide a comprehensive database of five million SNP assays compatible with Applied Biosystems genotyping platforms, as well as numerous annotations and selection criteria useful for the design of disease association research studies.

This version of SNPbrowser Software is designed to incorporate approximately one million SNPs from the first phase of the International HapMap Project and researchers can use it to select an optimal set of SNPs that are available as Applied Biosystems TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assays.

According to Applied Biosystems, the version of SNPbrowser Software has recently been used to generate published data that represents the multi-chromosome study analysing patterns of statistical association among SNPs across four major human populations (African American, Caucasian, Chinese, and Japanese).
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