We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Allergic Itching "Turned On" by Common Skin Protein
News

Allergic Itching "Turned On" by Common Skin Protein

Allergic Itching "Turned On" by Common Skin Protein
News

Allergic Itching "Turned On" by Common Skin Protein

Credit: Pixabay
Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Allergic Itching "Turned On" by Common Skin Protein"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

A commonly expressed protein in skin – periostin – can directly activate itch-associated neurons in the skin, according to new research from North Carolina State University. The researchers found that blocking periostin receptors on these neurons reduced the itch response in a mouse model of atopic dermatitis, or eczema. The findings could have implications for treatment of this condition.

Itch sensations are transmitted from neuronal projections in the skin through the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) – which are clusters of sensory cells located at the root of the spinal nerves – then to the spinal cord.

“We have found that periostin, a protein that is produced abundantly in skin as part of an allergic response, can interact directly with sensory neurons in the skin, effectively turning on the itch response,” says Santosh Mishra, assistant professor of neuroscience at NC State and lead author of a paper on the work. “Additionally, we identified the neuronal receptor that is the initial connection between periostin and itch response.”

Mishra and a team including colleagues from NC State, Wake Forest University and Duke University identified a receptor protein called αvβ3, which is expressed on sensory neurons in skin, as the periostin receptor.

In a chemically-induced mouse model of atopic dermatitis, the team found that exposure to common allergens such as dust mites increased periostin production in skin, exacerbating the itch response. However, when the researchers “turned off” the receptor protein, itch was significantly reduced.

“Periostin and its receptor connect the skin directly to the central nervous system,” Mishra says. “We have identified the first junction in the itch pathway associated with eczema. If we can break that connection, we can relieve the itch.”

Reference

Mishra et al. (2020) Periostin Activation of Integrin Receptors on Sensory Neurons Induces Allergic Itch. Cell Reports. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2020.03.036

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Advertisement