We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Advertisement

Epigenetic Regulator Identified as an Architect of Genome Folding

News   Apr 16, 2021 | Original story from Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics

 
Epigenetic Regulator Identified as an Architect of Genome Folding

In the Figure (left to right); i) cartoon representing the Rabl configuration of chromosomes in the early embryo. Pericentromeric regions are apical, chromosome arms are aligned and telomeres are basal. A-compartments are represented in yellow and B-compartments are represented in blue. ii) Immunofluorescence staining for HP1a in early embryo, reflecting the Rabl configuration as in the cartoon, with HP1 enrichment in pericentromeric regions. iii) Differential Hi-C contact map (log2-transformed), highlighting increased contact frequencies within chromosome arms, decreased inter-arm and inter-chromosome contacts, reduced associations within and between pericentromeric regions in HP1-KD embryos. iv) Snapshots of polymer simulations of chromatin folding in wild-type control (left) and mutant (right) conditions, where the pericentromeric regions are free to expand. Credit: MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, F. Zenk

 
 
Advertisement
 

RELATED ARTICLES

Severe COVID-19 Alters Gray Matter Volume in the Brain

News

Covid-19 patients who receive oxygen therapy or experience fever show reduced gray matter volume in the frontal-temporal network of the brain, according to a new study.

READ MORE

Map of Metabolic Changes After Heart Attack

News

Researchers have mapped out the changes in metabolism that occur after a heart attack, publishing their findings in the open-access eLife journal.

READ MORE

Study Finds COVID-19 Vaccines Do Not Damage the Placenta in Pregnancy

News

A new Northwestern Medicine study of placentas from patients who received the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy found no evidence of injury, adding to the growing literature that COVID-19 vaccines are safe in pregnancy.

READ MORE

 

Like what you just read? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Cell Science Genomics Research Proteomics & Metabolomics

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE