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MRC Technology and NYU School of Medicine Collaborate
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MRC Technology and NYU School of Medicine Collaborate

MRC Technology and NYU School of Medicine Collaborate
News

MRC Technology and NYU School of Medicine Collaborate

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MRC Technology and NYU School of Medicine have signed an agreement to develop an antibody for the prevention of inflammatory osteolysis (bone breakdown).

Drs Bruce Cronstein and Kathryn Moore of NYU School of Medicine have identified key proteins expressed on the surface of osteoclasts in the progression of inflammatory osteolysis. MRC Technology has extensive experience in antibody engineering and under the agreement will generate lead antibodies for testing in osteolysis models, before delivering a candidate antibody with acceptable efficacy in vivo. 

Dr Nadim Shohdy, Director, Drug Discovery Partnerships at NYU School of Medicine said: “Osteolysis affects about 20% of patients with orthopaedic prostheses, resulting in implant loosening and the need for revision surgeries. By combining the expertise of NYU School of Medicine in this area with that of MRC Technology, a leader in the discovery and development of antibody drugs, we aim to develop efficacious antibodies for patients with osteolysis that currently have few therapy options.”

Dr John Kelly, Associate Director, Business Development, MRC Technology said: “NYU School of Medicine has done extensive research and holds various patents for inhibiting osteolysis. Combined with our successful track record in antibody development to create therapies for a number of debilitating conditions, we are positive that we can help bring new treatments to patients.”

Financial terms have not been disclosed.

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