We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Rare Marine Bacteria Surprising Ally in Melanoma Battle
News

Rare Marine Bacteria Surprising Ally in Melanoma Battle

Rare Marine Bacteria Surprising Ally in Melanoma Battle
News

Rare Marine Bacteria Surprising Ally in Melanoma Battle

Credit: Pixabay.
Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Rare Marine Bacteria Surprising Ally in Melanoma Battle"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers report in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters that a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.

In melanoma, cancer cells form in melanocytes, the cells that color the skin. While new cases of most types of cancer are declining, those of melanoma — the deadliest form of skin cancer — continue to climb, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If melanoma metastasizes, or migrates to other locations in the body, prognosis is poor and treatment options are limited. New chemotherapy agents were recently approved that target melanomas with so-called “BRAF” mutations, but some of these tumors are already showing resistance to these therapies. William Fenical, James J. La Clair, Leticia Costa-Lotufo and colleagues decided the best solution would be to take aim at a completely different biochemical pathway in melanoma.


In 2014, the researchers discovered that seriniquinone, a natural product isolated from a rare marine bacteria, showed potent and selective activity against melanoma cells in a test tube. Even better, it was the first small molecule ever shown to target a particular protein involved in cancer proliferation. In their new work, the team identified the structural components of the natural product that were key to its activity, and then modified other parts of the molecule to make it more water soluble and easier to purify. Both these steps are necessary to make it more suitable as a drug. The researchers are now further refining these seriniquinone derivatives to optimize activity against melanoma.

This article has been republished from materials provided by the American Chemical Society. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference
Advance of Seriniquinone Analogues as Melanoma Agents. Justin C. Hammons, Lynnie Trzoss, Paula C. Jimenez, Amanda S. Hirata, Leticia V. Costa-Lotufo, James J. La Clair, and William Fenical. ACS Med. Chem. Lett., 2019, 10 (2), pp 186–190, DOI: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.8b00391.

Advertisement