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Virus-Based Tools for Cell Engineering

Illustration of a viral cell

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AMSBIO has added a new range of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) to its suite of virus-based tools for cell engineering and the study of viral infection.


Vesicular Stomatitis Virus is an enveloped, negative-stranded RNA virus with a simple structure. Its ability to infect a wide range of mammalian cell types has made it a valuable tool to study virus entry, replication, and assembly. A key advantage of the AMSBIO VSV model is that it undergoes only one round of replication. Consequently, it is safe to use and requires only a biosafety level 2 facility.


VSV vectors offer a robust model of viral infection that can be efficiently pseudo typed with envelope glycoproteins derived from heterologous viruses, making them highly suitable for studying the entry mechanisms of such high-risk viruses.


Drawing upon proprietary technologies and reagents, recombinant VSV vectors from AMSBIO benefit from top quality production protocols that deliver products unmatched in terms in terms of titer, purity, viability and consistency.


Recombinant VSV vectors from AMSBIO are the viral product of choice for a growing variety of applications including studying mechanisms of viral entry into host cells, identification of cellular receptors used by viruses for cell entry, screening of viral entry inhibitors and vaccine development research. 

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