15 Best Signs from the March for Science

List

We take a look at a selection of the best signs from the March for Science.

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Seven days in science - 21 April 2017

Quiz

Test your knowledge of what's been happening in the scientific world over the past seven days.

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A Genetic Scalpel for Modifying the Bacteria in Your Gut

News

Yale University researchers have developed new methods for regulating gene activity in a widespread group of microbiome bacteria in the gut of living mice.

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Giant Shipworm a Huge Example of Chemoautotrophic Symbiosis
Giant Shipworm a Huge Example of Chemoautotrophic Symbiosis
News

The cellular symbiosis is so effective the shipworm doesn't need to eat. Understanding these animal/bacteria symbioses will shed light on disease mechanisms and the development of antibiotics.

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CRISPR and Stem Cells Help Identify New Chlamydia Drug Targets
CRISPR and Stem Cells Help Identify New Chlamydia Drug Targets
News

Scientists have created an innovative technique for studying how chlamydia invades our immune system, using a combination of gene editing and stem cells.

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AI Could Help Diagnose TB in Remote Areas
AI Could Help Diagnose TB in Remote Areas
News

The use of artificial intelligence models to identify tuberculosis on chest X-rays could help improve diagnosis of the disease in remote areas with limited access to radiologists.

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Quick, Sensitive Diagnostic Tests with CRISPR
Quick, Sensitive Diagnostic Tests with CRISPR
News

Scientists have developed a CRISPR-based tool that can detect tiny amounts of Zika and Dengue virus, distinguish pathogenic bacteria, and identify DNA variations.

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Stem Cells Aid Understanding of Angelman Syndrome
Stem Cells Aid Understanding of Angelman Syndrome
News

University of Connecticut researchers are using stem cells to learn more about Angelman syndrome and identify possible therapeutic strategies.

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Using Light to Propel Water
Using Light to Propel Water
News

A new method which enables fluids to be controlled and separated on a surface using only visible light could lead to the development of microfluidic devices without built-in boundaries or structures.

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