The Legos of Life: Primordial Proteins Unveiled

Article   Jan 22, 2018 | by Ruairi Mackenzie, Science Editor for Technology Networks

 
The Legos of Life: Primordial Proteins Unveiled

Rutgers researchers identified a small set of simple protein building blocks (left) that likely existed at the earliest stages of life's history. Over billions of years, these 'Legos of life' were assembled and repurposed by evolution into complex proteins (right) that are at the core of modern metabolism. Credit: Vikas Nanda/Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Ruairi MacKenzie

Science Writer

 
 
 

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