We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Potentials and Pitfalls of Clinical Peptidomics and Metabolomics
News

Potentials and Pitfalls of Clinical Peptidomics and Metabolomics

Potentials and Pitfalls of Clinical Peptidomics and Metabolomics
News

Potentials and Pitfalls of Clinical Peptidomics and Metabolomics

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Potentials and Pitfalls of Clinical Peptidomics and Metabolomics"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Abstract
Clinical peptidomics and metabolomics are two emerging "-omics" technologies with the potential not only to detect disease-specific markers, but also to give insight into the disease dependency of degradation processes and metabolic pathway alterations. However, despite their rapid evolution and major investments, a clinical breakthrough, such as the approval of a major cancer biomarker, is still out of sight. What are the reasons for this failure? In this review we focus on three important factors: sensitivity, specificity and the avoidance of bias. The way to clinical implementation of peptidomics and metabolomics is still hampered by many of the problems that had to be solved for genomics and proteomics in the past, as well as new ones that require the creation of new analytic, computational and interpretative techniques. The greatest challenge, however, will be the integration of information from different "-omics" subdisciplines into straightforward answers to clinical questions, for example, in the form of new, superior "meta-markers".

The article is published online in Swiss Medical Weekly and is free to access.

Advertisement