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Chromogenic Tissue Staining Using DAB Detection Systems

Video

Watch our step-by-step IHC video protocol to learn how to develop your chromogenic staining with DAB reagent systems.

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Food Authenticity and Spectroscopy

List

You may have certainly enjoyed an authentic honey, wine, or olive oil. Yet, each of these foods are at risk for fraud. To mitigate and investigate food fraud, researchers use analytical methods, such as spectroscopy, to analyze the constituents of food.

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What Is Science Telling Us About Soil Testing and Treatment?

Article

Just as soil testing is important to the farmer, working to improve upon current soil testing methods is important to the agricultural scientist. By ensuring that farmers and agricultural workers have access to the best possible soil testing tools, they will then be more able to protect and improve the health of their land as needed.

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Mouse Study Can Explain How the Brain Turns Pain Up or Down

News

A new study in mice uncovered a previously unknown role that the central amygdala can play in upgrading or downgrading pain signals in the brain’s circuitry.

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Winner of 2019 Eppendorf and Science Prize Announced
News

Lauren Orefice has won the 2019 Eppendorf & Science Prize for Neurobiology for her work on the causes and potential therapies for autism spectrum disorders.

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Blood Protein Protects against Neuronal Damage after Brain Hemorrhage
News

Researchers have discovered a protein that can protect against brain damage after a hemorrhage.

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Does Time Spent on Social Media Affect Mental Health?
News

Researchers have suggested that the amount of time spent on social media is not directly responsible for increasing anxiety or depression.

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Merging With Machines: A Look at Emerging Neuroscience Technologies
Article

In this article we explore how emerging neurotechnologies are taking us from movement-controlled to mind-controlled machines and from machine extensions of ourselves to machines integrated into ourselves.

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Mouse Moms’ Microbiota Lead to Altered Behavior
Article

Research presented at Neuroscience 2019, the flagship conference of the Society for Neuroscience, has highlighted research at the intersection of three fascinating areas: neurodevelopment, the immune system and the gut microbiota.

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BNA Interview Series: Exploring the Inflamed Mind With Professor Ed Bullmore
Article

At the British Neuroscience Association's Festival of Neuroscience, we were lucky enough to sit down with some influential neuroscientists to discuss their work. In our last interview of the series, we talk to Professor Ed Bullmore on the evidence that connects inflammation and depression, and the possibility that the immune system could be targeted as part of future antidepressant treatments.

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Who Is Responsible for Reproducible Science?
Article

Reproducibility is now recognized as a core feature of good scientific practice but too many papers fail to meet the grade. We talked to Leslie D McIntosh, CEO of Ripeta, on the topic of reproducibility. In this interview, we ask Leslie about the concepts within Ripeta’s recent report on the state of reproducible science in 2019.

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Just a Gut Feeling: IBS, SIBO and the Gut-Brain Connection
Article

People often talk about their “gut instincts” or how they just “felt it in my guts”. Are these just figures of speech? It turns out that the gut – the digestive system – has its own nervous system that is often referred to as our “second brain”. This article investigates how our "two brains" communicate, and how breakdowns in that communication can lead to diseases like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

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Feeling Like a Fraud: Impostor Syndrome in STEM
Article

Impostor syndrome is experienced by millions of people around the world cross culturally, and describes difficulty internalizing one's accomplishments or abilities, and instead attributing their success to other factors. In this article, we explore the prevalence of impostor syndrome in STEM and the impact it has on the scientific community.

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