We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

World Down Syndrome Day 2019: An Interview With Down Syndrome Expert Dr Julia Kinder

Article

Dr Julia Kinder is a Down syndrome expert, national speaker, author, career consultant, fitness guru, and family practice physician. March 21st is World Down Syndrome Day, and we caught up with Julia to ask her how scientists, parents, and doctors can work together to benefit the lives of people with Down syndrome.

Read more

Advances in Alzheimer's Research 2019 ONLINE SYMPOSIUM

Webinar

This free to attend online symposium will highlight some of the most exciting research being conducted into the most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease.

Read more

Brain Region Explains Why Aphasia Patients Can Understand Written, But Not Spoken Words

News

Patients in a new Northwestern Medicine study were able to comprehend words that were written but not said aloud. They could write the names of things they saw but not verbalize them. This provides an insight into the brain degeneration that defines the rare dementia termed primary progressive aphasia.

Read more
 
Team Sport Participation Linked to Brain Changes in Children
News

Adult depression has long been associated with shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays an important role in memory and response to stress. Now, new research has linked participation in team sports to larger hippocampal volumes in children and less depression in boys ages 9 to 11.

Read more

Sleep and Ageing: Two Sides of the Same Coin?
News

Researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and ageing in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia. The scientists report how oxidative stress leads to sleep. Oxidative stress is also believed to be a reason why we age and a cause of degenerative diseases.

Read more

Of Mice, Men and... Computers?
News

Research carried out at SISSA in Trieste (Italy) and recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience confirms the similarities between rats, primates and artificial vision systems, a correspondence that paves the way to promising developments in the AI field.

Read more

 
 
 
 
Lower Brain Connectivity Makes the Working Day Tougher for Night Owls
Article

Working together with scientists at the University of Campinas in Brazil, and the University of Surrey, Birmingham researchers found that the brains of night owls have lower levels of connectivity in many brain regions which are implicated in the maintenance of consciousness.

Read more

Exploring Sleep and Genetics on World Sleep Day 2019
Article

March 15, 2019 marks World Sleep Day, an annual event organized by the World Sleep Society to celebrate sleep. Today, we explore the scientific research that looks at the links between our genes, why we sleep, and the negative impact a lack of sleep may have.

Read more

Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Science
Article

We recently spoke with Jessica Wade, PhD, a physicist at Imperial College London to learn more about her extraordinary efforts to raise the profile of female scientists and other underrepresented groups in science.

Read more

Establishing Immune Memory to Rabies in the CNS
Article

Researchers from Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University have highlighted how building a strong immune memory response to rabies virus in the brain and spinal cord is key to protecting the CNS against infection.

Read more

World Yoga Day: Finding the OM in GenOMics
Article

A recent climb in the number of people taking up a regular yoga or meditation practise has seen the terms “downward dog” and “tree pose” enter the everyday vocabulary of many. Today, on World Yoga Day, people come together across the world to celebrate the unity that yoga brings. However, from a scientific perspective, what evidence exists that supports the benefits of a regular yoga and meditation practise?

Read more