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Can We Really Measure Stress?

Article

Oxford Medistress, developer of the Leukocyte Coping Capacity (LCC) test, says that the test can measure your stress levels in 10 minutes, by sampling a drop of your blood. Could the test revolutionize the field of stress diagnostics? In this article we explore the history of measuring stress, and find out whether the LCC will be a milestone or side-note in that history.

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Promoting Credibility in Neuroscience Research: The 3Rs at the BNA Festival of Neuroscience

Article

The British Neuroscience Association's Festival of Neuroscience 2019 put improving research practice and methods at the forefront. In this article, the University of Bath's Naomi Heffer takes a look over why the BNA is promoting research "credibility", and what it means for the neuroscience community.

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Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mouse

News

What if scientists could manipulate your brain so that a traumatic memory lost its emotional power over your psyche? Researchers believe that a small structure in the brain could hold the keys to future therapeutic techniques for treating depression, anxiety, and PTSD, someday allowing clinicians to enhance positive memories or suppress negative ones.

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10 Things We Didn't Know Last Week – 10 May 2019

List

A wrap-up of the biggest science news from the last 7 days.

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Alzheimer's Protein Segment Plays the Hero in the Mouse Brain

News

The amyloid precursor protein has always been vilified as a major cause of Alzheimer’s disease. However, a recent has shown how it has an extended role in brain signaling that can prevent the development of Alzheimer’s disease in mice.

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Single Gut Bacteria Enterotype Associates Multiple Types of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
News

Researchers who sequenced the fecal samples of over 3,000 healthy volunteers recently described the so-called B2 enterotype, which is deficient in some anti-inflammatory bacteria. Today, they published more data, showing the high prevalence of this particular enterotype across multiple disease diagnoses.

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Antioxidant Overwhelmed by Tau in the Alzheimer's Brain
News

New research may explain why an antioxidant that protects the brain is also associated with deterioration in areas susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease. The antioxidant, superoxide dismutase or SOD1, improves cognition, but an Iowa State University research team found SOD1’s protective benefits dramatically weaken when levels of tau proteins – a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease – increase.

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Neuron Study Investigates the "Periodic Table of the Brain"
News

A new study describes a large profile of mouse neuron types based on two important characteristics of the cells: their 3D shape and their electrical behavior. The study, which yielded the largest dataset of its kind from the adult laboratory mouse to date, is part of a larger effort to discover the brain's "periodic table" through large-scale explorations of brain cell types.

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Addressing Gender Bias – “It Is Time to End the Tradition in Science of All-Male Speaking Panels”
Article

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the National Institutes of Health, has recently directly addressed the issue of underrepresented groups in science: "Too often, women and members of other groups underrepresented in science are conspicuously missing in the marquee speaking slots at scientific meetings and other high-level conferences.”

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A Microfluidic Valley is Growing in Europe, and You’re Invited
Article

A story of the Elvesys Innovation Unit, a research institute in France designed to unite entrepreneurs involved in microfluidics research.

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MeTooSTEM: A Mission to End Sexual Harassment in STEM
Article

In the wake of the "Me Too" (or #MeToo) movement, a spotlight has been cast on an additional obstacle that deters many individuals, particularly women, from working in STEM – the astonishingly high incidence of sexual harassment. In this article, we look at the extent of the issue and speak with some of the women that are working tirelessly to combat sexual harassment in STEM through a variety of organizations.

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Making Neuroscience More Credible at BNA 2019
Article

At the British Neuroscience Association's Festival of Neuroscience 2019, we pulled aside one of the BNA's credibility board, Dr Verena Heise to ask her about credibility in neuroscience, how she became involved in promoting it, and how other players in research can help advance the credibility cause.

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Whole-exome Sequencing at the Dawn of Personalized Medicine
Article

Deciphering the first complete sequence of the human genome in 2003 required a combined effort of scientists from 20 institutions and $3 billion of funding. Over the last decade, whole-exome sequencing (WES) established itself as a method that successfully balances cost and the output of useful data for diagnostic or research applications. Here, we look at how WES is used in both the laboratory and the clinic, and why it is a preferred method of choice in such areas.

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Antibodies in Research: The Good, the Bad, and the Validation Epidemic
Article

The specificity of antibody binding is incredibly important for many research disciplines, yet sourcing the best antibody for your research can be a challenge. This is partly because not all suppliers validate their antibodies sufficiently. How much of a problem is this?

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