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The Next Generation in Light Scattering for the Characterization of Macromolecules and Nanoparticles

Webinar

Throughout this webinar, you will be hearing from a variety of scientists from Wyatt Technology who will help explain some of the key advancements and improvements made in light scattering that will provide future customers with state-of-the-art capabilities and unique benefits.

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Imaging the Brain at High Spatiotemporal Resolution

Webinar

On February 26, UC Berkeley Associate Professor Na Ji will lead a webinar in which she will outline how her adaptive optics method — which uses concepts from astronomy and optics to preshape the excitation light used for imaging — can attain synapse-level spatial resolution throughout brain samples.

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Can a Nerve Injury Trigger ALS?

News

A growing collection of anecdotal stories raises the possibility that nerve injury in an arm or a leg can act as a trigger for the development amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS — a progressive neurodegenerative disease also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, named after the famous New York Yankee who died of it in 1941.

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Multi-organ "Human-on-a-Chip" Enables Long-term Toxicology Testing
News

The microfluidic device with interlinking modules containing human-derived heart, liver, skeletal muscle and nervous system cells was able to maintain cellular viability and record cellular function in real-time for 28 days.

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Human Gene Linked to a Better Recovery From Stroke
News

Neuroscientists have found that patients born without a gene called CCR5 recover better from mild stroke than patients with the gene.

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Study Could Lead to Sun Protection for Patients With Rare Genetic Disease
News

Skin cells taken from patients with a rare genetic disorder are up to ten times more sensitive to damage from ultraviolet A radiation in laboratory tests, than those from a healthy population, according to new research from the University of Bath.

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World Yoga Day: Finding the OM in GenOMics
Article

A recent climb in the number of people taking up a regular yoga or meditation practise has seen the terms “downward dog” and “tree pose” enter the everyday vocabulary of many. Today, on World Yoga Day, people come together across the world to celebrate the unity that yoga brings. However, from a scientific perspective, what evidence exists that supports the benefits of a regular yoga and meditation practise?

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Frontal Lobe Paradox: Where People Have Brain Damage But Don't Know It
Article

Humans have big brains and our frontal lobes, just behind the forehead, are particularly huge. Injuries to this part of the brain often happen after blows to the head or a stroke. Paradoxically, some people with frontal lobe injuries can seem unaffected – until they’ve been carefully evaluated.

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Lipidomics: A Rising Star in “OMICS” Research
Article

From medicine to make-up: until recently, a common misconception was that lipids are simply fat molecules, however, recent advances in technologies used to dissect and study lipid profiles prove that this is not the whole truth.

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Pluripotent Stem Cells in Drug Discovery: Can We Stem the Tide of Unsuccessful Drugs?
Article

Stem cells were first discovered in human cord blood in 1978. Why would we think they can be of more help now? This article delves into reasons behind the sudden interest in stem cells, and highlights how they can be used to advance drug discovery.

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The Science of Why so Many People Believe in Psychic Powers
Article

You would think that instances of proven psychic fraud over the years would weaken the credibility of psychic claims.

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