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"Peter Pan" Neurons Stay Young Through Life

News

Researchers have discovered a mysterious group of neurons in the amygdala -- a key center for emotional processing in the brain -- that stay in an immature, prenatal developmental state throughout childhood

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The Neuroscience Roundup - 06/21/19

List

Here's a short selection of our favorite neuroscience stories from the last week!

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The Way Forward for Antibodies in Neuroscience

Blog

Antibodies are an essential part of everyday neuroscience research. But recently, high-profile criticism has cast doubt on their reliability and reproducibility. We caught up with Bio-Techne’s Raymond Chan and Katherine Bradley to find out how providers are hoping to improve antibodies and make them fit for a more reproducible future in neuroscience.

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Can We Really Measure Stress?

Article

Oxford Medistress, developer of the Leukocyte Coping Capacity (LCC) test, says that the test can measure your stress levels in 10 minutes, by sampling a drop of your blood. Could the test revolutionize the field of stress diagnostics? In this article we explore the history of measuring stress, and find out whether the LCC will be a milestone or side-note in that history.

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Fibromyalgia Linked to Gut Bacteria for First Time

News

In a paper published today in the journal Pain, a Montreal-based research team has shown, for the first time, that there are alterations in the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of people with fibromyalgia.

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How Kids Suppress Tics Could Be Key to Battling Tourette Syndrome
News

At least 20 percent of elementary school-age children develop tics such as excessive blinking. It was thought most tics go away on their own, except in rare cases. However, researchers have discovered that tics don't go away completely; rather, most children simply exhibit tics less when others are watching. Learning how they do that may help others at risk for significant tic disorders.

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"Hidden Consciousness" Could Predict Recovery for Brain Injury Patients
News

Close analysis of EEG data reveals that nearly 1 in 7 brain-injured ICU patients shows evidence of hidden consciousness just days after injury. Patients with such signs are more likely to recover, neurologists at Columbia University and NewYork-Presbyterian have found.

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Making Memories - It's All in the Timing
News

As animals discover what sounds tend to precede predatorial attack or what smells predict dinner, they develop a kind of biological clairvoyance, a way to anticipate what's coming next, based on their environment. Now, scientists have found that an animal's education relies not only on what experiences it acquires, but also on when it acquires them.

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Addressing Gender Bias – “It Is Time to End the Tradition in Science of All-Male Speaking Panels”
Article

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the National Institutes of Health, has recently directly addressed the issue of underrepresented groups in science: "Too often, women and members of other groups underrepresented in science are conspicuously missing in the marquee speaking slots at scientific meetings and other high-level conferences.”

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A Microfluidic Valley Is Growing in Europe, and You’re Invited
Article

A story of the Elvesys Innovation Unit, a research institute in France designed to unite entrepreneurs involved in microfluidics research.

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Promoting Credibility in Neuroscience Research: The 3Rs at the BNA Festival of Neuroscience
Article

The British Neuroscience Association's Festival of Neuroscience 2019 put improving research practice and methods at the forefront. In this article, the University of Bath's Naomi Heffer takes a look over why the BNA is promoting research "credibility", and what it means for the neuroscience community.

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MeTooSTEM: A Mission to End Sexual Harassment in STEM
Article

In the wake of the "Me Too" (or #MeToo) movement, a spotlight has been cast on an additional obstacle that deters many individuals, particularly women, from working in STEM – the astonishingly high incidence of sexual harassment. In this article, we look at the extent of the issue and speak with some of the women that are working tirelessly to combat sexual harassment in STEM through a variety of organizations.

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Making Neuroscience More Credible at BNA 2019
Article

At the British Neuroscience Association's Festival of Neuroscience 2019, we pulled aside one of the BNA's credibility board, Dr Verena Heise to ask her about credibility in neuroscience, how she became involved in promoting it, and how other players in research can help advance the credibility cause.

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Whole-exome Sequencing at the Dawn of Personalized Medicine
Article

Deciphering the first complete sequence of the human genome in 2003 required a combined effort of scientists from 20 institutions and $3 billion of funding. Over the last decade, whole-exome sequencing (WES) established itself as a method that successfully balances cost and the output of useful data for diagnostic or research applications. Here, we look at how WES is used in both the laboratory and the clinic, and why it is a preferred method of choice in such areas.

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