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Brain Markers for Angry Dreams

News

Researchers have identified a pattern of brain activity that reflects anger experienced during dreaming according to a new study carried out on healthy adults and published in The Journal of Neuroscience. The study helps to clarify the neural basis of dream emotions.

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Three Tips for Beating Imposter Syndrome

News

Researchers from the HSE Perm, in collaboration with an American colleague, confirmed the theory that impostor syndrome fully mediates the link between perfectionism and psychological distress.

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Sugar Shock Leads to Memory Loss

News

The loss of memory and cognitive function known to afflict survivors of septic shock is the result of a sugar that is released into the blood stream and enters the brain during the life-threatening condition. This finding explains the premature mental aging that follows septic shock and may shed light on memory loss in other diseases.

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Collecting the Right Quantity of Evidence: How the Brain Makes a Difficult Decision
News

Two publications track the perceptual decision making process from the sensory receptors to the final action.

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Brain Regions Linked to Memory and Emotion Help Humans Navigate Smell
News

The work points to the existence of a grid-like hexagonal structure in olfactory-related brain areas, similar to mapping configurations previously found to support spatial navigation in animals.

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Light Physical Activity May Reduce Brain Aging
News

Incremental physical activity, even at light intensity, is associated with larger brain volume and healthy brain aging.

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Sensitivity vs Specificity
Article

When developing diagnostic tests or evaluating results, it is important to understand how reliable those tests and therefore the results you are obtaining are. By using samples of known disease status, values such as sensitivity and specificity can be calculated that allow you to evaluate just that.

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A Further Dimension to Drug Discovery: Combining 3D Culture With iPSCs
Article

Running in parallel with advances in 3D cell culture is the growing use of human cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Researchers are interested in testing drugs in the most physiologically relevant models possible, so it was only a matter of time before these two approaches converged – providing optimized systems for disease modeling and drug toxicity testing.

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Stimulation Gives Working Memory a Boost
Article

A new study from Boston University researchers suggests that non-invasive stimulation using weak electrical current can reverse the effects of aging on working memory, at least temporarily, by synchronizing different rhythms of brainwave.

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New Neurons Until Ninety: Discovering Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus
Article

Far from being a process that ends in maturity, a new study has found that the adult human brain is capable of producing new neurons until the tenth decade of life. This ability is substantially impaired in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which researchers say could help predict the onset of AD.

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Can Physical Exercise Help Keep Our Brain Healthy?
Article

Exercise might not be fun, but it’s good for your body. Over the years, science has well established that exercise can cut your risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. But the ways that exercise affects the brain are still under investigation, although new research suggests it may be essential for the growth of new neurons.

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World Down Syndrome Day 2019: An Interview With Down Syndrome Expert Dr Julia Kinder
Article

Dr Julia Kinder is a Down syndrome expert, national speaker, author, career consultant, fitness guru, and family practice physician. March 21st is World Down Syndrome Day, and we caught up with Julia to ask her how scientists, parents, and doctors can work together to benefit the lives of people with Down syndrome.

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