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Leading Minds Reflect On How the World Feels About Science and Health
Article

Gauging global attitudes to science and health is no easy task, but it was the goal of The Wellcome Global Monitor – a survey of over 140,000 people aged 15 and older, from more than 140 countries. The findings present an unprecedented view of the relationship between science and society worldwide, which were discussed by leaders at the launch event in Washington D.C.

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Can We Really Measure Stress?
Article

Oxford Medistress, developer of the Leukocyte Coping Capacity (LCC) test, says that the test can measure your stress levels in 10 minutes, by sampling a drop of your blood. Could the test revolutionize the field of stress diagnostics? In this article we explore the history of measuring stress, and find out whether the LCC will be a milestone or side-note in that history.

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Addressing Gender Bias – “It Is Time to End the Tradition in Science of All-Male Speaking Panels”
Article

Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. Director of the National Institutes of Health, has recently directly addressed the issue of underrepresented groups in science: "Too often, women and members of other groups underrepresented in science are conspicuously missing in the marquee speaking slots at scientific meetings and other high-level conferences.”

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A Microfluidic Valley Is Growing in Europe, and You’re Invited
Article

A story of the Elvesys Innovation Unit, a research institute in France designed to unite entrepreneurs involved in microfluidics research.

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Promoting Credibility in Neuroscience Research: The 3Rs at the BNA Festival of Neuroscience
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The British Neuroscience Association's Festival of Neuroscience 2019 put improving research practice and methods at the forefront. In this article, the University of Bath's Naomi Heffer takes a look over why the BNA is promoting research "credibility", and what it means for the neuroscience community.

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MeTooSTEM: A Mission to End Sexual Harassment in STEM
Article

In the wake of the "Me Too" (or #MeToo) movement, a spotlight has been cast on an additional obstacle that deters many individuals, particularly women, from working in STEM – the astonishingly high incidence of sexual harassment. In this article, we look at the extent of the issue and speak with some of the women that are working tirelessly to combat sexual harassment in STEM through a variety of organizations.

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Whole-exome Sequencing at the Dawn of Personalized Medicine
Article

Deciphering the first complete sequence of the human genome in 2003 required a combined effort of scientists from 20 institutions and $3 billion of funding. Over the last decade, whole-exome sequencing (WES) established itself as a method that successfully balances cost and the output of useful data for diagnostic or research applications. Here, we look at how WES is used in both the laboratory and the clinic, and why it is a preferred method of choice in such areas.

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Making Neuroscience More Credible at BNA 2019
Article

At the British Neuroscience Association's Festival of Neuroscience 2019, we pulled aside one of the BNA's credibility board, Dr Verena Heise to ask her about credibility in neuroscience, how she became involved in promoting it, and how other players in research can help advance the credibility cause.

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Antibodies in Research: The Good, the Bad, and the Validation Epidemic
Article

The specificity of antibody binding is incredibly important for many research disciplines, yet sourcing the best antibody for your research can be a challenge. This is partly because not all suppliers validate their antibodies sufficiently. How much of a problem is this?

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Exascale Computing to Unlock the Mysteries of the Human Brain
Article

The human brain sequesters many mysteries. How does cognitive development take place? How does it help us learn? What causes brain diseases? An exciting venture involving researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Chicago, Harvard University, and Princeton University is preparing to unleash a $500-million supercomputer, dubbed Aurora, in the pursuit of these answers.

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