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Latest Articles
Light Sheet Imaging Helps Capture Zebrafish Neural Development
Article

Light Sheet Imaging Helps Capture Zebrafish Neural Development

A video showing the birth of an incredible network of neurons in the nervous system of a Zebrafish has won first prize at the Nikon Small World in Motion Awards, which highlight the best in photography and video captured through the microscope lens. We caught up with researchers behind the video to find out more.
'Microdosers' of LSD and Magic Mushrooms are Wiser and More Creative
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'Microdosers' of LSD and Magic Mushrooms are Wiser and More Creative

Researchers just ran the first ever pre-registered scientific study on the microdosing of psychedelics and found some very promising results.
Developing FTICR Mass Spectrometry Instruments with Unique Capabilities
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Developing FTICR Mass Spectrometry Instruments with Unique Capabilities

Here Prof. Peter B. O'Connor, University of Warwick, touches on the adaptability of mass spectrometry, enabling researchers to study cancer, neurological disease, petroleum, and biopharmaceuticals.
 Inflamyloid: What Is It and Why Is It Important in Alzheimer's Disease?
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Inflamyloid: What Is It and Why Is It Important in Alzheimer's Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia worldwide. Classically, the “amyloid” hypothesis, which ties the disease’s spread to that of amyloid protein, is thought to underlie AD’s pathology. After years of mixed to negative results in clinical trials, new research is underway to investigate what role the brain’s own immune system plays in amyloid-driven disease; an “infl-amyloid” hypothesis.

Through the Looking Glass of Single Cell Proteomics
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Through the Looking Glass of Single Cell Proteomics

To pick apart the differences between individual cells in complex multicellular organisms, we need to look at cells one-by-one. This article takes a look at how several scientists in North America are using single cell proteomics (SCP) technologies to discern disease pathogenesis and enhance directed stem-cell differentiation.
Exploring the Public’s Perception of Food Fraud
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Exploring the Public’s Perception of Food Fraud

When you go to the shops to buy the weekly groceries, it’s quite likely you’ll find yourself thinking about where your food has come from. Is this organic? Is that free-range? You are perhaps less likely to find yourself wondering, “Is this food fake?”
Unlocking the Secrets of Brain Organization -in the Fruit Fly
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Unlocking the Secrets of Brain Organization -in the Fruit Fly

As many people spent the summer trying to keep the flies away from their fruit-bowls, an international group of scientists published one of the biggest and most important datasets in the field of connectomics to date, the complete 3D electron micrograph volume of the fruit-fly (Drosophila melanogaster) brain.
Exploring Consciousness with Psychedelics
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Exploring Consciousness with Psychedelics

Chris Timmermann, from The Psychedelic Research group at Imperial College London studies the action of psychedelics on the brain and their potential as therapeutics. This article reviews their research and their implications.
Using Therapeutic Antibodies Against Alzheimer’s Disease
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Using Therapeutic Antibodies Against Alzheimer’s Disease

What if immunotherapy was the solution to cure Alzheimer’s disease (AD)? AD represents a major health issue as it affects an increasing number of people each year. The search for a therapy against AD is uncertain. Nevertheless, we can hope that the fast-growing advances in biotechnologies could lead to an improvement in diagnostics and a better understanding of the disease.
Does the Brain Really Feel no Pain?
Article

Does the Brain Really Feel no Pain?

The brain has no nociceptors – the nerves that detect damage or threat of damage to our body and signal this to the spinal cord and brain. This has led to the belief that the brain feels no pain. A belief that has entered popular culture.

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