Latest Articles

From transcription to function: mapping brain networks
Article

The brain is a series of connected functional networks which coordinate the control of processes like vision and language. Mapping the molecular networks that underlie this connectivity would provide an unprecedented understanding of brain function in health and disease.

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Genetic links to the seasonal clock
Article

Have trouble with changing seasons? Maybe your genetics are to blame.

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Microbes, mood, and mental health
Article

Everyone has had a “gut feeling”—some liken it to “butterflies” in the stomach before a stressful event, while others deem it a type of intuition—and scientists are bringing this age-old phenomenon into the present-day lab in order to better understand how mental health disorders arise and how they might be treated better.

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“Special K” could offer new hope for treatment-resistant depression
Article

Over the past several decades, the pharmaceutical industry has been abandoning the research and development of treatments for psychiatric disorders, despite the ever-growing need for novel, more efficacious, and better targeted therapeutics.

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Conscious coupling: The early path to circuit formation in the neocortex
Article

Catapulting human intelligence above all other creatures is the highly precise formation of neuronal circuits in the cerebral cortex. This is not an easy feat since an estimated 16 billion molecularly distinct neurons are packed within the cerebral cortex.

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What are the odds: Picking winners in the race to identify genetic components of gambling disorders
Article

Gambling can have large negative consequences on the social, personal and financial lives of people. Disordered gambling (DB) is a term used to describe people with clinically diagnosed gambling addiction and those with gambling tendencies which trend towards—but don’t yet meet—the clinical threshold for diagnosis.

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The role of dopaminergic neurons in decision making
Article

A crucial element for the survival of animals and humans is learning how to acquire rewarding stimuli—food, sex, and social rewards. While learning is powerful skill, nothing in the world remains the same for long, and learning must be adaptive in order to allow an animal to flexibly survive a changing environment.

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A new approach to treat asthma: Silencing nociceptor neurons in the lungs
Article

Asthma sufferers regularly experience coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. It is a disease that targets the airways of the lung, and affects almost 1 in 10 people. The lung contains sensory neurons called nociceptors that alert us to pain or irritation.

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The memory game: Rapid formation of new associations
Article

The formation of memories occurs rapidly, sometimes even after a single experience. Memory formation depends on an area of the brain known as the medial temporal lobe (MTL). However, the mechanism for how memories are so swiftly encoded is largely unknown and large technical challenges generally hinder experiments in awake behaving humans.

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Trippy research: Chemically-induced synesthesia
Article

In April 1943, scientist Albert Hoffman ingested 250 micrograms of a substance he had synthesized five years prior. Less than an hour later, he “perceived an uninterrupted stream of fantastic pictures, extraordinary shapes with intense, kaleidoscopic play of colors.

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