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Latest Articles

Lower Brain Connectivity Makes the Working Day Tougher for Night Owls
Article

Working together with scientists at the University of Campinas in Brazil, and the University of Surrey, Birmingham researchers found that the brains of night owls have lower levels of connectivity in many brain regions which are implicated in the maintenance of consciousness.

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Exploring Sleep and Genetics on World Sleep Day 2019
Article

March 15, 2019 marks World Sleep Day, an annual event organized by the World Sleep Society to celebrate sleep. Today, we explore the scientific research that looks at the links between our genes, why we sleep, and the negative impact a lack of sleep may have.

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Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Science
Article

We recently spoke with Jessica Wade, PhD, a physicist at Imperial College London to learn more about her extraordinary efforts to raise the profile of female scientists and other underrepresented groups in science.

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Establishing Immune Memory to Rabies in the CNS
Article

Researchers from Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University have highlighted how building a strong immune memory response to rabies virus in the brain and spinal cord is key to protecting the CNS against infection.

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World Yoga Day: Finding the OM in GenOMics
Article

A recent climb in the number of people taking up a regular yoga or meditation practise has seen the terms “downward dog” and “tree pose” enter the everyday vocabulary of many. Today, on World Yoga Day, people come together across the world to celebrate the unity that yoga brings. However, from a scientific perspective, what evidence exists that supports the benefits of a regular yoga and meditation practise?

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Frontal Lobe Paradox: Where People Have Brain Damage But Don't Know It
Article

Humans have big brains and our frontal lobes, just behind the forehead, are particularly huge. Injuries to this part of the brain often happen after blows to the head or a stroke. Paradoxically, some people with frontal lobe injuries can seem unaffected – until they’ve been carefully evaluated.

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Lipidomics: A Rising Star in “OMICS” Research
Article

From medicine to make-up: until recently, a common misconception was that lipids are simply fat molecules, however, recent advances in technologies used to dissect and study lipid profiles prove that this is not the whole truth.

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Pluripotent Stem Cells in Drug Discovery: Can We Stem the Tide of Unsuccessful Drugs?
Article

Stem cells were first discovered in human cord blood in 1978. Why would we think they can be of more help now? This article delves into reasons behind the sudden interest in stem cells, and highlights how they can be used to advance drug discovery.

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The Science of Why so Many People Believe in Psychic Powers
Article

You would think that instances of proven psychic fraud over the years would weaken the credibility of psychic claims.

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