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Latest Articles

A Further Dimension to Drug Discovery: Combining 3D Culture With iPSCs
Article

Running in parallel with advances in 3D cell culture is the growing use of human cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells. Researchers are interested in testing drugs in the most physiologically relevant models possible, so it was only a matter of time before these two approaches converged – providing optimized systems for disease modeling and drug toxicity testing.

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Of Currents and Photons: Should Neuroscientists Use Imaging or Electrophysiology to Monitor Neural Activity?
Article

Once viewed as competing to be the best way of doing in vivo neuroscience, optical and electrical recording techniques are now being embraced as complementary methods in the quest to understand the brain.

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Stimulation Gives Working Memory a Boost
Article

A new study from Boston University researchers suggests that non-invasive stimulation using weak electrical current can reverse the effects of aging on working memory, at least temporarily, by synchronizing different rhythms of brainwave.

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New Neurons Until Ninety: Discovering Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus
Article

Far from being a process that ends in maturity, a new study has found that the adult human brain is capable of producing new neurons until the tenth decade of life. This ability is substantially impaired in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which researchers say could help predict the onset of AD.

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Can Physical Exercise Help Keep Our Brain Healthy?
Article

Exercise might not be fun, but it’s good for your body. Over the years, science has well established that exercise can cut your risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer. But the ways that exercise affects the brain are still under investigation, although new research suggests it may be essential for the growth of new neurons.

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World Down Syndrome Day 2019: An Interview With Down Syndrome Expert Dr Julia Kinder
Article

Dr Julia Kinder is a Down syndrome expert, national speaker, author, career consultant, fitness guru, and family practice physician. March 21st is World Down Syndrome Day, and we caught up with Julia to ask her how scientists, parents, and doctors can work together to benefit the lives of people with Down syndrome.

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Lower Brain Connectivity Makes the Working Day Tougher for Night Owls
Article

Working together with scientists at the University of Campinas in Brazil, and the University of Surrey, Birmingham researchers found that the brains of night owls have lower levels of connectivity in many brain regions which are implicated in the maintenance of consciousness.

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Exploring the Genetics of Sleep
Article

In this article, we explore the scientific research that looks at the links between our genes, why we sleep, and the negative impact a lack of sleep may have.

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Addressing the Underrepresentation of Women in Science
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We recently spoke with Jessica Wade, PhD, a physicist at Imperial College London to learn more about her extraordinary efforts to raise the profile of female scientists and other underrepresented groups in science.

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Establishing Immune Memory to Rabies in the CNS
Article

Researchers from Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University have highlighted how building a strong immune memory response to rabies virus in the brain and spinal cord is key to protecting the CNS against infection.

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