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How stress tears us apart: Important synaptic mechanism highlighted

A team from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) Brain Mind Institute has discovered an important synaptic mechanism: the activation of a cleaving enzyme, leading to behavioral problems connected to chronic stress Why is it that when people are too stressed they are often grouchy, grumpy, nasty, distracted or forgetful? Researchers from the Brain Mind Institute (BMI) at EPFL have just highlighted a fundamental synaptic mechanism that explains the relationship between chronic stress and the loss of social skills and cognitive impairment.
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Benefits & risks of yoga for bipolar disorder

Newly published results from a survey of people with bipolar disorder who practice yoga have begun to document the reported benefits and risks of the practice. The information, plus a pilot clinical trial currently underway, could help psychologists develop yoga as an adjunctive therapy for the condition.
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Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene

Mutation that arose long ago may be key to humans’ unique ability to produce and understand speech. Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans’ unique ability to produce and understand speech.
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How learning to talk is in the genes

Researchers have found evidence that genetic factors may contribute to the development of language during infancy. Scientists from the Medical Research Council (MRC) Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol worked with colleagues around the world to discover a significant link between genetic changes near the ROBO2 gene and the number of words spoken by children in the early stages of language development.
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Slowed processing speed linked with executive deficits in multiple sclerosis

Kessler Foundation researchers have published a study supporting the role of slowed processing speed in the executive deficits found in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). "Does slowed processing speed account for executive deficits in multiple sclerosis? Evidence from neuropsychological performance and structural neuroimaging," was published online ahead of print on August 18 by Rehabilitation Psychology.
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PMC Recognizes Mark Levin with Award for Leadership

Award to be presented November 12, 2014 highlights lifelong personalized medicine vision.
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EEG study findings reveal how fear is processed in the brain

An estimated 8% of Americans will suffer from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point during their lifetime. Brought on by an overwhelming or stressful event or events, PTSD is the result of altered chemistry and physiology of the brain.
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Neuroimaging technique identifies concussion-related brain disease in living brain

Detection while patient is still alive improves accuracy of diagnosis and enables estimation of prevalence and risk An experimental positron emission tomography (PET) tracer is effective in diagnosing concussion-related brain disease while a person is still alive, according to a case study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and at Molecular Neuroimaging (MNI) LLC in New Haven, and published September 16 in the journal Translational Psychiatry.
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Researchers debunk myth about Parkinson's disease

Using advanced computer models, neuroscience researchers at the University of Copenhagen have gained new knowledge about the complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease. The findings have recently been published in the Journal of Neuroscience.
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This is your brain on snacks: Brain stimulation affects craving, consumption

Magnetic stimulation of a brain area involved in "executive function" affects cravings for and consumption of calorie-dense snack foods, reports a study in the September issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society.
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