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Applied Biosystems Scientists Use Next-Generation Sequencing to Associate Methylation Patterns with the Development of Cancer
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Applied Biosystems Scientists Use Next-Generation Sequencing to Associate Methylation Patterns with the Development of Cancer

Applied Biosystems Scientists Use Next-Generation Sequencing to Associate Methylation Patterns with the Development of Cancer
News

Applied Biosystems Scientists Use Next-Generation Sequencing to Associate Methylation Patterns with the Development of Cancer

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Applied Biosystems has unveiled new approaches for using next-generation genomic analysis sequencing to better understand methylation patterns in various cancers.

A team of research and development scientists utilized the SOLiD™ System, an advanced genomic analysis technology, to characterize methylation of repetitive elements in the genome, and to identify patterns that could be used as biomarkers for cancer.

Researchers study patterns of methylation, a chemical modification to DNA across specific regions of a genome, to investigate how epigenetic changes or variations in gene expression impact on biological processes.

Methylation has been reported to inactivate expression of cancer suppressing genes, while demethylation of oncogenes, when mutated or expressed at high levels, help turn a normal cell into a cancer cell. Repetitive events may lead to genomic instability and changes in expression that initiate or accelerate cancer progression.

Applied Biosystems’ scientists studied chemical modifications of DNA by taking advantage of the SOLiD System’s capabilities in the mapping and data analysis of methylation patterns. As part of this research, the team used a new reagent from Invitrogen, a division of Life Technologies, to obtain high-read densities across methylated regions of the genome.

The MethylMiner™ Methylated DNA Enrichment Kit is designed to provide researchers with a library preparation protocol, allowing researchers to construct DNA libraries for methylation analysis, and to identify methylation patterns as potential markers of disease susceptibility.

Data presented at the 100th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Denver, demonstrates the ability of the SOLiD System to comprehensively characterize the methylation status of a model genome.

Melissa Barker, an Applied Biosystems Senior Staff Scientist at Life Technologies, “As scientists continue to unravel the complexities of human disease, we are finding that a methylation approach, to analyze both genetic and epigenetic changes across the genome, will be essential for uncovering clues to help us effectively treat complex diseases.”
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