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Autologous stem cell therapy is helpful in traumatic brain injury
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Autologous stem cell therapy is helpful in traumatic brain injury

Autologous stem cell therapy is helpful in traumatic brain injury
News

Autologous stem cell therapy is helpful in traumatic brain injury

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Therapy reduced interventions needed to keep pediatric patients out of danger zone


The use of cell therapy after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children can reduce the amount of therapeutic interventions needed to treat the patient, as well as the amount of time the child spends in neurointensive care, according to research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School.


The study appears in the journal Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.


TBI patients at Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital from 2000 to 2008 were divided into two groups: those who received autologous bone marrow stem cells as part of a pilot study and those who did not. Researchers used the Pediatric Intensity Level of Therapy score to determine the degree of therapeutic intensity that was done to reduce the cranial pressure below the danger zone.


For those who received the stem cells, researchers noted a significant reduction in the score beginning at 24 hours post-treatment through the first week. Patients who did not receive the stem cells spent nearly twice as much time in neurointensive care -- 15.6 days compared to 8.2.


"Everything we do to treat traumatic brain injury is aimed at reducing the pressure in the brain," said Charles S. Cox, Jr., M.D., principal investigator, professor and the George and Cynthia Mitchell Distinguished Chair in Neurosciences at UTHealth and co-director of the Texas Trauma Institute at Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center. "We can measure the pressure and there are medications to reduce the water in the brain but all of those have risks associated with them, such as renal failure and kidney problems. Our study showed that with stem cell therapy, we need to do less intervention for a shorter period of time for the patient."


Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston   press release


Publication

Cox CS et al. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Reduce Therapeutic Intensity for Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Children.   Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Published March 2015. doi: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000000324


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