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Biosystems International SAS Initiates Development of a Diagnostic Blood Test for Lung Cancer
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Biosystems International SAS Initiates Development of a Diagnostic Blood Test for Lung Cancer

Biosystems International SAS Initiates Development of a Diagnostic Blood Test for Lung Cancer
News

Biosystems International SAS Initiates Development of a Diagnostic Blood Test for Lung Cancer

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Biosystems International a biotechnology company focused on the development of novel monoclonal antibody-based cancer diagnostics has initiated the development of an in vitro diagnostic blood test for lung cancer. This decision is based on the successful validation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies on multiple cohorts of lung cancer patients and control subjects.

The antibodies of the test under development were discovered using BSI’s patented monoclonal antibody proteomics platform which has delivered a panel of lung cancer specific antibodies that has been tested on 4 patient cohorts totaling 367 patients and 304 controls and demonstrates > 80% sensitivity and > 80% specificity.

Importantly, similar values were obtained on a subpopulation of 128 patients with stage I cancer, demonstrating the strong potential to develop the first blood test to detect early stage lung cancer when it is treatable by surgery resulting in a dramatic increase in the chance for survival. Furthermore, a subset of antibodies discriminates between different histological subtypes, a finding which can aid in accurate diagnosis assuring appropriate treatment.

To confirm the specificity of the antibody panel to lung cancer, it has also been tested on control cohorts including subjects with non-malignant lung pathologies such as COPD, bronchial pneumonia, and fibrosis, as well as lung tumors of non-pulmonary origin. In all cases the antibodies were insensitive to these conditions as well as gender, treatment and smoking status.
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