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Expression Pathology Obtains Second U.S. Liquid Tissue® Patent
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Expression Pathology Obtains Second U.S. Liquid Tissue® Patent

Expression Pathology Obtains Second U.S. Liquid Tissue® Patent
News

Expression Pathology Obtains Second U.S. Liquid Tissue® Patent

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Expression Pathology Inc. has announced that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued patent number 7,906,301, multiplex method for increased proteomic coverage from histopathologically processed biological samples, tissues and cells.

The claims of the patent cover methods that increase the range of proteins and protein modifications which can be analyzed using the company’s patented Liquid Tissue® method.

Formalin fixation is the standard process used worldwide to preserve patient biopsies and surgical tissue, but it limits the ability to analyze proteins by advanced methodologies such as mass spectrometry. Liquid Tissue reagents and methods enable application of mass spectrometry for targeted quantitation of protein biomarkers.

“This new patent further strengthens our proprietary position with respect to methods for developing suitable target peptides for our Liquid Tissue-SRM assays”, says Casey Eitner, the company’s President and CEO.

Eitner continued, “Being able to digest the tissue with multiple enzymes, for example, opens the door to development of assays for target proteins and protein modifications that may not be amenable to analysis using standard SRM mass spectrometry methods”.

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