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Imaging Study Assesses Brain Differences in People Living With HIV

News   Jan 21, 2021 | Original story from the Keck School of Medicine of USC

 
Imaging Study Assesses Brain Differences in People Living With HIV

The shift of HIV-infection from a fatal to chronic condition in the era of more widely available treatment appears to be accompanied by a shift in the profile of HIV-related brain abnormalities beyond the basal ganglia (yellow), frequently implicated in earlier studies, to limbic structures (red). Credit: Image courtesy of Talia M. Nir, Neda Jahanshad, and James Stanis of the Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

 
 
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