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Leading Proteomic Centre in Europe Becomes Reference Centre for Denator’s Stabilization Technology
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Leading Proteomic Centre in Europe Becomes Reference Centre for Denator’s Stabilization Technology

Leading Proteomic Centre in Europe Becomes Reference Centre for Denator’s Stabilization Technology
News

Leading Proteomic Centre in Europe Becomes Reference Centre for Denator’s Stabilization Technology

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Denator has announced that the Proteome Research Centre, at UCD Conway Institute, Dublin, Ireland will become a reference centre for the company’s Stabilizor™ T1 system for stabilizing tissue sample from the moment of sampling.

As a reference centre, the Proteome Research Centre at UCD Conway Institute will demonstrate the Stabilizor technology to other potential customers and gain early access to new products for stabilization of biological samples.

Prof. Michael Dunn at the Proteome Research Centre, explained, ‘Degradation begins seconds after sampling, thereby distorting the composition of the in vivo proteome. Denator’s rapid heat inactivation technology ensures complete elimination of enzymatic activity, thereby preserving the intact proteome. This will be an important tool that will help to further our understanding of the molecular basis of biological processes in health and disease.’

Prof. Giuliano Elia, Director of the Proteomics/MS Resource Core Facility added, ‘To gain early access to new products for stabilization of biological samples is naturally of great interest for us and will favor us in our work with different types of samples and applications.’
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